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How a Nation Grieves:
Press Accounts of the Death of Lincoln, 
the Hunt for Booth, and America in Mourning
Edited by Glenn Alan Cheney
with a foreword by
U.S. Representative Joe Courtney

A real-time look at America’s most traumatic moment as seen through the eyes of newspaper journalists and editors. lincoln.html
Quilombo dos Palmares: Brazil’s Lost Nation of Fugitive Slaves

Over the span of the 17th century, the Quilombo dos Palmares , a sprawling nation of fugitive slaves in northeast Brazil, fought off the world’s largest empires. With an egalitarian society and rudimentary parliamentary government, the quality of life in Palmares rivaled that of European society on the coast. The last king of Palmares is believed to have been an educated descendant of slaves. He took the name Zumbi—Lord of War—and built a citadel fortress on a mountain in northeast Brazil. There Palmares made its last stand. palmares.html
Stories from Yantic Cemetery
by Melodye A. Whatley

There are over 11,000 stories buried in Yantic Cemetery 
in Norwich, Connecticut.
 
This book tells more than 100 of them. yantic.html
Thanksgiving: The Pilgrims’ First Year in America
by Glenn Alan Cheney

Thanksgiving is not a book about a holiday. It’s about something that a few dozen survivors did after a year of suffering, death, struggle, and courage.

Thanksgiving is a history not of heroes and cataclysmic events but of just plain people. It reflects virtually everything that each passenger did, how they lived and died, how they got along with the local people, and how they expressed their thanks with a feast that would come to define the American people. thanksgiving.html

New London Librarium

History Series

Religions in Rio
(As Religiões no Rio)
by João do Rio
translated by Ana Lessa-Schmidt, Ph.D.

João do Rio is considered one of the most literary journalists and novelists of early 20th century Brazil. His writing is astonishingly modern, often bordering on the poetic. Religions of Rio is a deep, eclectic and modern look at the practices and beliefs within the society of Rio de Janeiro at the turn of the 19th century. The author’s insights excel on a historical (almost anthropological) account of the Afro-Brazilian religions of Candomblé and Umbanda, among others. Ana Lessa-Schmidt’s brilliant translation retains the beauty of João do Rio’s writing while rendering cultist mysteries with details, insight, precision, and grace. religionsinrio.html